do you have an attitude of gratitude?

do you have an attitude of gratitude?

count your blessings. feel good, enjoy good health and more happiness 

writing in a gratitude journal three times per week might actually have a greater impact on our happiness than journaling every day.

don’t overdo it. evidence suggests writing occasionally (1-3 times per week) is more beneficial than daily journaling. that might be because we adapt to positive events and can soon become numb to them—that’s why it helps to savour surprises.*

journalling tips

there’s no wrong way to keep a gratitude journal, but here are some general instructions as you get started.

write down up to five things for which you feel grateful. the physical record is important—don’t just do this exercise in your head. the things you list can be relatively small in importance (the tasty sandwich I had for lunch today.) or relatively large (my friend gave birth to a healthy baby boy.). the goal of the exercise is to remember a good event, experience, person, or thing in your life—then enjoy the good feeling emotions that come with it.

as you write: be as specific as possible—specificity is key to connecting to the feeling of gratitude. ‘i’m grateful that my neighbour brought me soup when I was sick on tuesday’ will be more effective than ‘i’m grateful for my neighbours.’

go for depth over breadth. elaborating in detail about a particular person or thing for which you’re grateful carries more benefits than a superficial list of many things.

revise the detail if you are repeating the entry in your journal. writing about some of the same people and things is ok, but focus in on a different aspect in detail.

savour surprises. try to record events that were unexpected or surprising, as these tend to boost stronger levels of gratitude.

see good things as ‘gifts’.  thinking of the good things in your life as gifts guards against taking them for granted. try to relish and savour the gifts you’ve received.

you can also try subtraction, not just addition. consider what your life would be like without certain people or things, rather than just tallying up all the good stuff. be grateful for the negative outcomes you avoided, escaped, prevented, or turned into something positive—try not to take that good fortune for granted.

get personal. focusing on people to whom you are grateful has more of an impact than focusing on things for which you are grateful.

go for depth over breadth. elaborating in detail about a particular person or thing for which you’re grateful carries more benefits than a superficial list of many things.

don’t worry if you are not making regular entries. if you have created a journal great you will use it when it feels right for you. enjoy it 

hope to see you soon & often
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*please see our sources page for references to data quoted above


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